FOUR DIRECTIONS INSTITUTE

Community Enhancement

HOME
GRANT REQUEST MAIN PAGE
GRANT SUMMARY
GRANT PROPERTY
PROJECT COST
PROPOSAL SUMMARY
SITE ANALYSIS
NEED
USERS
COMMUNITY ENHANCEMENT
THE INSTITUTE

 

    Four Directions Institute is currently constructing its new campus at Hesperia Lake, Hesperia, California.  Phase I of the project is approximately 75% complete and 86% funded.  Completing this phase will necessitate the securing of an additional $100,000 in capital grant funding.

 

Community Enhancement

 

     The proposed site is an unimproved plain that is presently unused by the community. It is contiguous with the usually dry stretch of the Mojave River. This aesthetic project would introduce riparian trees, additional ponds, and buildings. It would avail this property to recreation, education, and historical preservation.
     The park would include an arboretum of North American indigenous plants and trees relative to the various habitats of the Native American cultures represented in the various architecture. This will help to develop an understanding in the visitors of the relationships that the various Native American cultures had with their respective environments thereby providing an immersed experience for those visitors enhancing knowledge and reducing stereotypical views.
     The immediate region of Hesperia has a rich prehistory and history heretofore essentially disregarded. This not only involves tribes such as the resident Vanyume, but their relationships with neighboring Serrano and the late arriving Chemehuevi tribes as well as their conflicts with the Mojave and Southern Paiutes. The area, indeed the exact area occupied by Hesperia Lake Park, was visited by such famous historical characters as Francisco GarcÚs, Jedediah Smith, and Kit Carson and it rests along the Mormon and Holcomb Valley Trails.
     Hesperia, and indeed the high desert, is not an affluent area. Recreational and educational opportunities that are readily available to more affluent communities are not available in the high desert. There is no Griffith park with its zoo or Gene Autry Museum nor is there a Balboa Park or Exposition Park or Golden Gate Park with all of their amenities. This minimal investment would go a great distance in filling that void.